Parolees & Probationers

Parolees & Probationers

The return of drug‐involved inmates to the community is a critical issue for public health and safety. In the United States, more than 700,000 inmates leave prisons annually and more than two‐thirds have a drug problem. Relapse contributes to the re‐arrest of more than two‐thirds, and the re-incarceration of more than half of inmates in the 3 years after release.
Only a small percentage of Ohio inmates currently get access to drug treatment, according to Gary Mohr, director of the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction. He estimates that 30,000 inmates need treatment for drug or alcohol addictions, but the state currently can afford to treat only 4,500. The Ohio prison agency will spend $58.1 million during that same period on community-based corrections programs that will keep low-level, non-violent offenders out of prison.
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Percentage of Prisoners Released who Commit Crime Within 3 Years of their Release
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Percentage of Inmates who Meet Criteria for Substance Abuse and Addiction
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Percentage of People Aged 12 or Older Who Received Substance Abuse Treatment When They Needed iI (2013) https://www.ncja.org/ncja/policy/substance-abuse

source: https://medrio.com/blog/overcoming-patient-recruitment-and-retention-hurdles/

According to a report by the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) about 68 percent of 405,000 prisoners released in 30 states in 2005 were arrested for a new crime within three years of their release from prison, and 77 percent were arrested within five years.  That is an enormous cost to the states.
Recidivism is crippling to individual state and national economies.Some states spend over $500 million on its prison system. Total spending on corrections nationwide exceeds $60 billion per year.
Addiction is serious problem that requires effective treatment. Personalized feedback interventions (PFIs) have been used as an effective treatment for drinking; however, the potential beneficial effects of this treatment on illegal drug use have not been explored.
The present study examined the effects of PFIs in a sample of repetitive drug-related offenders. Participants were 50 repetitive drug-related offenders incarcerated in a Japanese prison. They were randomly assigned to the PFIs (n  = 20) or control ( n  = 30) group. The PFIs group received six letters for 3 months, whereas the control group did not undergo any interventions.