Liver Transplants

Liver Transplants

Currently there are nearly 17,000 people waiting for a liver transplant in the United States.  
Although patients young and old receive liver transplant, generally speaking transplant patients have become substantially older, more ethnically and socially diverse, and less healthy. The rates of all major comorbidities has increased substantially, including the rate of pre-transplant diabetes (20% at 2017), obesity and hypertension and coronary artery disease that doubled in the last decade. Of chronic liver disease aetiologies, the most common is primary liver malignancy (4.2 to 18.7%) and non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease (7.4%), while hepatitis C infection remains the most common indication for liver transplant.
Once a liver transplant has been completed, several medications must be taken in order to prevent complications and rejection of the organ.  Immunosuppressive medication is one of the pivotal factors in the outcome of liver transplant patients. Non-adherence to immunosuppressive therapy is a common problem after transplantation and affects graft and patient survival.  Therefore, there is a need to identify and manage this issue in part through the verification and detection of the use of liver transplant medications, specifically immunosuppressants such as: Tacrolimus; Cyclosporine; Mycophenolate mofetil.
  • Volume

    There are 7,000 liver transplants performed each year in the United States and currently, nearly 17,000 people waiting for a liver transplant in the United States .
  • Need

    17 – 20 people die every day as a result of not getting the necessary liver transplants they need.
  • Trends

    The rates of all major co-morbidities has increased substantially, the most common is primary liver malignancy (4.2 to 18.7%) and non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease (7.4%), while hepatitis C infection remains the most common indication for liver transplant.
  • Challenges

    Despite the recent advances in pharmacological solutions and surgical techniques, medication non-adherence remains a significant challenge to graft survival and overall health outcomes.
  • Process

    Once a liver transplant has been completed, several medications must be taken in order to prevent complications and rejection of the organ
  • Treatment

    Knowing how and when a patient takes a prescribed immuno-suppressant is critical in preventing organ rejection; clinical impression is not sufficient to determine whether people are taking their medications after they have had a liver transplant. An objective assessment method should be used.
  • Non-Adherence

    Immunosuppressive medication is one of the pivotal factors in the outcome of liver transplant patients. Non-adherence to immunosuppressive therapy is a common problem after transplantation and affects graft and patient survival.